Wound Healing Society
Wound Healing Society Program

Program   Posters

DAY 1: WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2018
Day 2 >>
8:00 AM - 8:15 AM
Room 207
WHS WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION
8:15 AM - 9:15AM
Room 207
WHS SESSION A: WOUND HEALING FOUNDATION THOMAS K. HUNT LECTURE
(non-accredited)

Moderators: Laura Parnell, BS, MS, CWS
Speaker: Elaine Fuchs, PhD

In the spirit of the pioneering work of its namesake, Elaine Fuchs, PhD was chosen by the Wound Healing Foundation as the 2018 Thomas K. Hunt Honorary Lecturer. Dr Fuchs' major contributions in skin stem cell research are likely to advance the field of wound healing. This one-hour session will provide an overview of skin stem cell reservoirs, tissue generation and repair by stem cells and the impact of communication and environment in normal and dysfunctional situations. Dr Fuchs' will discuss how her research might impact the field of wound healing, and conclude with a vision for future research.
9:15 AM - 9:30 AM
BREAK
9:30 AM - 11:00 AM
Room 207
WHS SESSION B: ADJUNCTS TO WOUND HEALING
Moderators: Adrian Barbul, MD
Speaker: Ally-Khan Somani, MD; David J. Margolis, MD; Maximillian Kueckelhouse, MD

Innumerable intrinsic and extrinsic factors may delay, impair, accelerate, or enhance wound healing. In this session, the latest science elucidating the role of oxidants and anti-oxidants, nutrition, dressings, and bioengineered constructs in wound healing and ways they can be manipulated will be discussed.
11:00 AM - 11:15 AM
BREAK
11:15 AM - 12:45 PM
Room 207
WHS Session C: INFLAMMATION, FRIEND OR FOE?
Moderators: Robert F. Diegelmann, PhD
Speakers: Robert F. Diegelmann, PhD; MS; Boris Hinz, BSc, PhD

Tissue homeostasis, disease, and response to injury are governed by complex interactions between immune cells and other non-immune cells involved in wound healing. These interactions are shaped by micro-environmental factors such as the extracellular matrix or the presence of pathogens. This session will discuss new research on how immune cell behavior modulates tissue repair processes and response to infection, with applications in the development of novel therapies for inflammatory skin disease and chronic wound healing.
12:45 PM - 2:00 P.M
LUNCH ON OWN
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
Room 207
WHS Session D: ETRS / WHS JOINT SESSION- WOUND GENOMICS AND PROTEOMICS
Moderators: Harriet W. Hopf, MD; Phil Stephens, MD
Speaker: Ulrich auf dem Keller, MD; Sashwati Roy, PhD; Jeffrey M. Davidson, MD; PhD; Ardeshir Bayat, AA/AS

The roles of cell recruitment, gene expression, and protein synthesis in successful healing cannot be overemphasized. Using the latest in genomic and proteomic technology, researchers hope to learn about the activation of genes, the proteins that are actually transcribed, and their role in leading to successful repair. Further, the importance of banking tissue or patient samples, extracting DNA and analyzing and sequencing them can lead to therapeutic intervention. In this session, the complex roles of proteins in wound healing will be addressed through discussion of the genomics and proteomics of acute and chronic wounds.
3:30 PM - 3:45 PM
BREAK
3:45 PM - 5:15 PM
Room 207
WHS Session E: SCAFFOLDS IN WOUND HEALING
Moderators: Howard Levinson, MD
Speaker: Howard Levinson, MD; Craig Duvall, PhD; Stephen F. Badylak, DVM, PhD, MD

Scaffolds represent a bio-mechanical approach to tissue repair. Provision of scaffolds, which are biologically degradable, provides an initial road map for cells and matrix to organize around the site of injury; they are a way of increasing and regulating the repair process by providing a matrix to be filled with cells and wound products. The biomechanics of the composition of the scaffolds can also play a role in the repair process by acting as signals to cells. Different approaches to designing and applying scaffolds will be highlighted.
5:15 PM - 5:30 PM
BREAK
6:30 PM-9:30 PM
SOCIAL EVENT FOR WHS MEMBERS AT THE NASCAR HALL OF FAME

Registered WHS members are invited to attend the NASCAR Hall of Fame at 6:30pm for a memorable night of food and activities. This is a WHS Members event, but limited guest tickets may be available for purchase.
** Tickets are required for entry.
** Please pick up your reserved tickets at the WHS membership booth near the WHS General Session Room.
DAY 2: THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 2018
<< Day 1 | Day 3 >>
7:30 AM - 9:00 AM
206A, 209A, 209B
WHS COMMITTEE MEETINGS
9:00 AM - 9:15 AM
BREAK
9:15 AM - 9:30 AM
Crown Ballboom
SAWC SPRING OPENING CEREMONY
9:30 AM - 10:30 AM
Crown Ballboom
KEYNOTE ADDRESS: FIRED UP OR BURNOUT: BUILDING TEAMS THAT THRIVE
Speaker: Dan Diamond, MD, FAAFP
10:30 AM - 10:45 A.M
BREAK
10:45 AM - 11:45 AM
Room 207BCD
WHS Session F: EDUCATING THE NEXT GENERATION OF WOUND CARE LEADERS: GLOBAL NETWORKING
Moderators: Susan W. Volk, VMD, PhD, Dipl ACVS; Lisa Gould, MD
Speakers: Pamela Scarborough, PT, DPT, MS, CDE, CWS, CEEAA; William Ennis, DO, MBA, FACOS; Elizabeth Foy White-Chu, MD

As the prevalence and incidence of complex wounds continues to rise, the need for skilled clinicians is increasing. Wound care is by nature an inter-professional specialty, leading to challenges in developing a standardized curriculum. Meanwhile, increasing competition for limited healthcare resources means that securing funding for wound management education and research is becoming more and more difficult. Increasing efficiency in translation of basic research findings into clinical solutions is paramount to addressing this discrepancy. Critical to this mission is a strategic approach for educating the next generation of wound care leaders and the development of global networks for basic and clinical wound care research.
11:45 AM - 12:00 PM
BREAK
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
INDUSTRY-SUPPORTED LUNCH SYMPOSIA
1:30 PM - 1:45 PM
BREAK
1:45 PM - 4:00 PM
Room 207BCD
WHS Session G: YOUNG INVESTIGATORS SYMPOSIUM
Moderators: Phil Stephens, MD; Sashwati Roy, PhD; Elof Eriksson, MD

In this session, young investigators involved in cutting-edge research will compete for the WHS Young Investigator Award. The winner will present his/her work at the ETRS meeting. Oral presentations will feature the top eight abstracts submitted to the WHS by young investigators as well as the winner of the ETRS Young Investigator Award.
1:45
G.01. WOUND FLUID AS A BIOMARKER: A METABOLOMIC APPROACH
Amitava Das, Subendu Sarkar, Joshua Johnson, Carly Polcyn, Scott Chaffee, Piya Das Ghatak, Suman Santra, Gayle M. Gordillo, Sashwati Roy, Chandan K. Sen
Comprehensive Wound Center, Center for Regenerative Medicine and Cell Based Therapies, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA
2:00
G.02. MECHANOSENSITIVE LYMPHOCYTES POTENTIATE WOUND REPAIR BY REGULATING INFLAMMATION AND EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX
Xinyi Wang1, Emily Steen1, Alexander Blum1, Hui Li1, Natalie Templeman1, Swathi Balaji1, Paul Bollyky2, Sundeep Keswani1
1BCM, Houston, TX, USA,2Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
2:15
G.03. CAVEOLIN 1 INHIBITS KERATINOCYTE MIGRATION AND WOUND CLOSURE BY ORCHESTRATING CYTOSKELETAL REORGANIZATION
Ivan Jozic1, Andrew P. Sawaya1, George D. Glinos1, Lulu L. Wong1, Tongyu C. Wikramanayake1, Irena Pastar1, Robert S. Kisner1, Harold Brem2, Marjana Tomic-Canic1
1University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA,2Winthrop Hospital/Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, USA
2:30
ETRS YOUNG INVESTIGATOR AWARD WINNER
G.04. THERMOSENSITIVE BIOMIMETIC POLYISOCYANOPEPTIDE HYDROGELS MAY FACILITATE WOUND REPAIR
Roel Op 't Veld, Hans Von Den Hoff, Onno Van Den Boomen, Ditte Lundvig, Ewald Bronkhorst, Paul Kouwer, John Jansen, Frank Wagener, Alan Rowan
Radboud University Medical Centre, Gelderland, Netherlands
2:45
G.05. A NOVEL SEQUENTIAL MULTI-TIERED IN-VIVO APPROACH FOR QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION OF TOPICALS FOR TREATMENT OF HUMAN SKIN SCARRING
Rubinder Basson1, Martin Isabelle2, David Reece2, Philip Foden3, Mohamed Baguneid3, Ardeshir Bayat1
1University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom,2Renishaw, Gloucestershire, United Kingdom,3Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom
3:00
G.06. MAST CELL ACTIVITY DURING SCAR MATURATION: MULTIPLE SEQUENTIAL TIME POINT ANALYSIS IN-VIVO SHOW ITS UNIQUE LOCALISATION AND ROLE IN SKIN HEALING
Sara Ud-Din1, Mohamed Baguneid2, Douglas McGeorge3, Martin Barron1, Silvia Bulfone-Paus1, Ardeshir Bayat1
1University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom,2Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom,3Nuffield Health Chester Hospital, Chester, United Kingdom
3:15
G.07. SINGLE CELL RNA-SEQ ANALYSES OF HEALTHY SKIN AND DIABETIC ULCERS REVEALS FUNDAMENTALLY DIFFERENT CELL TYPE-SPECIFIC TRANSCRIPTIONAL PROFILES
Georgios Theocharidis, Swati Bhasin, Konstantinos Kounas, Thanh Dinh, Barry Rosenblum, Manoj Bhasin, Aristidis Veves
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
3:30
G.08. PRRX1 LABELS THE FIBROGENIC FIBROBLAST IN THE VENTRAL DERMIS
Michael Hu, Tripp Leavitt, Julia Garcia, Ryan Ransom, Ulrike Litzenburger, Graham Walmsley, Clement Marshall, Alessandra Moore, Shamik Mascharak, Charles Chan, Derrick Wan, Peter Lorenz, Howard Chang, Michael Longaker
Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
4:00 PM - 4:15 PM
BREAK
4:15 PM - 5:15 PM
WHS SESSION H: CONCURRENT ORAL ABSTRACTS I (non-accredited)
Oral abstract presentations will feature the highest scoring abstracts submitted to the WHS.
 
Room 207BCD
Acute Wounds (H1)
Moderators: Boris Hinz, MD; Marielle Walraven, PhD
4:15
H1.01. INHERENT FEATURES IN HUMAN ORAL EPITHELIA DETERMINE HEIGHTENED WOUND HEALING
Ramiro Iglesias-Bartolome1, Akihiko Uchiyama1, Rose Graf1, Alfredo A. Molinolo2, Loreto Abusleme3, Stephen R. Brooks4, Juan Luis Callejas-Valera2, Dean Edwards2, Colleen Doci2, Marie-Liesse Asselin-Labat5, Mark Onaitis5, Niki Moutsopoulos3, J. Silvio Gutkind2, Maria I. Morasso1
1Laboratory of Skin Biology, NIAMS, NIH, Bethesda, MD,USA2Oral and Pharyngeal Cancer Branch, NIDCR, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA3Oral Immunity and Inflammation Unit, NIDCR, NIH, Bethesda, MD,USA4Biodata Mining and Discovery Section, NIAMS, NIH., Bethesda, MD,USA5Moores Cancer Center, UCSD, La Jolla, CA, USA
4:25
H1.02. DELAYED WOUND HEALING IN USP15 KNOCKOUT MICE
Yixuan Zhao, Guo-You Zhang, Qing-Feng Li
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital,Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai, China
4:35
H1.03. SCAR RE-PIGMENTATION: MELANOCYTE REPOPULATION IN TEMPORAL HUMAN SKIN SCARRING AND ITS ONGOING INTERACTION WITH INFLAMMATION AND ANGIOGENESIS
Sara Ud-Din1, Philip Foden2, Mohsin Mazhari2, Samer Al-Habba2, Mohamed Baguneid2, Ardeshir Bayat1
1University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom,2Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom
4:45
H1.04. USE OF NICOTINE REPLACEMENT THERAPY IN ACTIVE SMOKERS IS ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED WOUND COMPLICATION RATES IN BREAST SURGERY
Zhenzhen Xu, Rance Fujiwara, Lisa Fucito, Steven Bernstein, Henry C. Hsia
Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA
4:55
H1.05. KERATINOCYTE-SECRETED HSP90A-CONTAINING EXOSOMES ARE A DRIVING FORCE OF WOUND CLOSURE
Wei Li
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA
5:05
H1.06. CARDIAC PROGENITOR CELL RECRUITMENT MODULATES REGULATION OF EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX DEPOSITION FOLLOWING MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION
Maggie M. Hodges, Carlos Zgheib, Junwang Xu, Junyi Hu, Sarah A. Hilton, Lindel C. Dewberry, Kenneth W. Liechty
The Laboratory for Fetal and Regenerative Biology, Department of Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine and Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA
 
Room 207A
Infection and Biofilms (H2)
Moderators: Swathi Balaji, PhD; Lauren Moffatt, PhD
4:15
H2.01. PF PHAGE IN CHRONIC PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA WOUND INFECTIONS
Michelle S. Bach, Jolien Sweere, Elizabeth B. Burgener, Paul L. Bollyky, Gina A. Suh
Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
4:25
H2.02. STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS BIOFILM INFECTION COMPROMISES WOUND HEALING BY CAUSING DEFICIENCIES IN GRANULATION TISSUE COLLAGEN
Suman Santra1, Sashwati Roy1, Sriteja Dixith1, Amitava Das1, Subhadip Ghatak1, Piya Das Ghatak1, Savita Khanna1, Shomita Mathew-Steiner1, Valerie K. Bergdall2, Daniel J. Wozniak3, Chandan K. Sen1
1Comprehensive Wound Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA,2Department of Veterinary Preventive Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA,3Department of Microbiology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
4:35
H2.03. ELECTRICAL STIMULATION SIGNFICANTLY IMPACTS BIOFILM VIABILITY, METABOLISM, BIOMASS AND VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND PROFILES
Mohammed Ashrafi1, Lilyann Novak-Frazer1, Mohamed Baguneid2, Teresa Alonso-Rasgado1, Riina Rautemaa-Richardson1, Ardeshir Bayat1
1The University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom,2Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom
4:45
H2.04. POLYMICROBIAL BIOFILM INFECTION DYSREGULATES CERAMIDE METABOLISM COMPROMISING FUNCTIONAL CUTANEOUS WOUND CLOSURE OF THE SKIN
Nandini Ghosh1, Mithun Sinha1, Dayanjan S. Wijesinghe2, Shomita Mathew-Steiner1, Savita Khanna1, Daniel J. Wozniak3, Gayle M. Gordillo1, Sashwati Roy1, Chandan K. Sen1
1Comprehensive Wound Center, Center for Regenerative Medicine and Cell Based Therapies, Department of Surgery, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA,2School of Pharmacy, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA,3Dept of Microbiology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
4:55
H2.05. VIABLE CRYOPRESERVED UMBILICAL TISSUE (VCUT) INHIBITS BACTERIAL GROWTH IN A SUBCUTANEOUS RAT INFECTION MODEL
Sandeep Dhall1, Turhan Coksaygan2, Tyler M. Hoffman1, Anne Lerch1, Jin-Qiang Kuang1, Malathi Sathyamoorthy1, Alla Danikovitch1
1Osiris Therapeutics Inc., Columbia, MD, USA, 2University of Maryland, Baltimore, Baltimore, MD, USA
5:05
H2.06. VALIDATION OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON HUMAN WOUND MODELS AND CONFIRMATION OF THEIR USABILITY IN SKIN-RELEVANT BIOFILM STUDIES
Mohammed Ashrafi1, Lilyann Novak-Frazer1, Mohamed Baguneid2, Teresa Alonso-Rasgado1, Guoqing Xia1, Riina Rautemaa-Richardson1, Ardeshir Bayat1
1The University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom,2Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom
 
Room 203A
Bioengineering (H3)
Moderators: Timothy W. King, MD, PhD; Mithun Sinha, PhD
4:15
H3.01. PHOTOACTIVE TYPE I (ATELO)COLLAGEN AS BUILDING BLOCK OF ADVANCED WOUND DRESSINGS
Giuseppe Tronci
University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom
4:25
H3.02. INCUBATION OF PORCINE URINARY BLADDER MATRIX OF ENDOTHELIAL CELLS AND KERATINOCYTES FROM DIABETIC PATIENTS RESTORES A NON-DIABETIC PHENOTYPE
John Paige1, David Lightell, Jr.2, Jace Landry1, T. Cooper Woods2
1LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA,2Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA
4:35
H3.03. REGENERATION OF MERKEL CELLS IN ENGINEERED SKIN SUBSTITUTES GRAFTED TO MICE
Dorothy M. Supp1, Jennifer M. Hahn1, Kevin L. McFarland1, Kelly A. Combs1, Andrea L. Lalley1, Christopher M. Lloyd1, Steven T. Boyce2
1Shriners Hospitals for Children - Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA,2University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA
4:45
H3.04. A NEW HERNIA MESH PRECISELY ENGINEERED TO PREVENT HERNIA RECURRENCE
Mohamed M. Ibrahim, Richard R. Glisson, Ken Gall, Howard Levinson
Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
4:55
H3.05. STABILIZED COLLAGEN MATRIX DRESSING IMPROVES WOUND MACROPHAGE FUNCTION AND EPITHELIALIZATION
Mohamed S. El Masry1, Amitava Das1, Scott Chaffee1, Piya Das Ghatak1, Shomita Mathew-Steiner1, Natalia Higuita-Castro1, Raafat A. Anani2, Sashwati Roy1, Chandan K. Sen1
1Department of Surgery, Center for Regenerative Medicine and Cell Based Therapies and Comprehensive Wound Center, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA,2Department of General Surgery,Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt
5:05
H3.06. IMPLANTABLE OXYGEN PLATFORM FOR CONTINUOUS, REAL-TIME DETECTION OF VASCULAR PERFUSION AND ISCHEMIA
Mohamed M. Ibrahim, Ryan M. Schweller, Mahmoud M. Mohammed, David B. Powers, Bruce Klitzman
Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
 
Room 203B
Burn Wounds (H4)
Moderators: Elizabeth A. Grice, MD; Amanda S. MacLeod, MD
4:15
H4.01. DESIGN AND TEST OF TARGETED LIPID-NANOPARTICLES IN BURN WOUND CARE
Subhadip Ghatak, Jilong Li, Mohamad S. El Masry, Amitava Das, Yang Liu, Sashwati Roy, Robert J. Lee, Chandan K. Sen
The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
4:25
H4.02. GRANZYME K IMPAIRS WOUND HEALING
Christopher T. Turner1, Matthew Zeglinski1, Hongyan Zhao1, Phillip Bird2, Anthony Papp1, David Granville1
1University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada,2Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
4:35
H4.03. REDUCTION OF INFECTION AND TISSUE LOSS IN A PORCINE MODEL OF PROLONGED FIELD CARE
Kristo Nuutila1, Lu Yang1, Josh Grolman2, Michael Broomhead1, Andrew Onderdonk3, David Mooney2, Elof Eriksson1
1Applied Tissue Technologies, Hingham, MA, USA,2Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA,3Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA
4:45
H4.04. DETERMINATION OF ADEQUATE DEBRIDEMENT OF BURN WOUNDS VIA LASER SPECKLE IMAGING
Randolph Stone, II, David Larson, John Wall, Kyle Florell, Hannah Dillon, Christine Kowalczewski, Shanmugasundaram Natesan, Robert Christy
US Army Institute of Surgical Research, Fort Sam Houston, TX, USA
4:55
H4.05. ALLOGENEIC CD26 / CD55 CELL THERAPY FOR TREATING BURN WOUNDS
Artem Trotsyuk, Melanie Rodrigues, Clark Bonham, Paul Mittermiller, Geoffrey Gurtner
Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
5:05
H4.06. EFFICACY OF PRESSURE GARMENT THERAPY AT REDUCED LENGTHS OF DAILY WEAR
Danielle M. DeBruler1, Jacob C. Zbinden1, Molly E. Baumann1, Britani N. Blackstone1, John K. Bailey1, Dorothy M. Supp2, Heather Powell1
1The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA,2Shriners Hospitals for Children, Cincinnati, OH, USA
5:30 PM - 8:30 PM
Hall AB
GRAND OPENING OF EXHIBITS/COCKTAIL RECEPTION
WHS Exhibit Booth #318
DAY 3: FRIDAY, APRIL 27, 2018
<< Day 2 | Day 4 >>
7:15 AM - 8:30 AM
Room 209A
WRR Editorial Board Meeting
7:30 AM - 9:00 AM
INDUSTRY-SUPPORTED SYMPOSIUM BREAKFAST
9:00 AM - 9:15 AM
BREAK
9:15 AM - 10:15 AM
Room 207BCD
WHS SESSION I: BEST JOURNAL ARTICLES of 2017-2018
Moderators: Luisa DiPietro, DDS, PhD; Jeffrey M. Davidson, MD, PhD
Speakers: Luisa DiPietro, DDS, PhD; Jeffrey M. Davidson, MD, PhD

Keeping up with the literature in wound healing science and practice is a challenge! In this session, some of the highest impact articles of the past year that advanced our knowledge and understanding will be reviewed. Join us and catch up!
10:15 AM - 10:30 AM
BREAK
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM
Room 207BCD
WHS SESSION J: ETRS SESSION: PROGENITOR CELLS AND MOLECULAR MECHANISMS IN WOUND HEALING
Moderators: Boris Hinz, BSc, PhD
Speakers: Sabine Eming, MD; Phil Stephens, MD

Chronic and/or fibrotic healing occur when body-inherent repair capacities are impaired or overwhelmed. Regenerative medicine could support the body┤s repair force by replacing/supporting injured, diseased or aged tissues with fully functional counterparts or stem/progenitor cells from various sources. However, regenerative medicine still faces challenges, one of which is our incomplete understanding of progenitor cell biology. Following implantation, regenerative stem cells can fail to acquire the desired functionality and become part of the dysregulated repair process by developing tumorigenic or fibrotic/scarring features. This session will discuss how fundamental repair signaling pathways can be controlled in progenitor cells to promote human adult organ regeneration. The clinical implications of recent research findings will be discussed.
11:30 AM - 11:45 AM
BREAK
11:45 AM - 2:15 PM
Hall AB
LUNCH WITH EXHIBITORS
12:15 PM - 2:00 PM
Room 210AB
WHS MEET THE MENTORS (non-accredited)
Moderators: Harriet W. Hopf, MD
Speakers: Lisa Gould, MD

As a new faculty member, clinician, or investigator, how can you simultaneously establish a successful clinical practice while developing a productive line of research and establishing a funded research laboratory? In this session, trainees and junior faculty will have the opportunity to learn from successful leaders in wound healing research and practice, first through a keynote address and then at interactive tables highlighting areas such as obtaining grant funding, navigating the academic promotion process, managing your time, and translating science into innovations through technology commercialization.
2:00 PM - 2:15 PM
BREAK
2:15 PM - 3:15 PM
WHS SESSION K: CONCURRENT ORAL ABSTRACTS II (non-accredited)
Oral presentations will feature the highest scoring abstracts submitted to the WHS.
 
Room 207BCD
Chronic Wounds (K1)
Moderators: Traci A. Wilgus, PhD; Sara Ud-Din, BSc, MSc
2:15
K1.01. USING IN VIVO LABEL-FREE MULTIPHOTON MICROSCOPY TO MONITOR WOUND METABOLISM
Jake D. Jones, Hallie E. Ramser, Alan Woessner, Kyle P. Quinn
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, USA
2:25
K1.02. OUTCOME ANALYSIS OF HYPERBARIC OXYGEN THERAPY IN DIABETIC WOUNDS AND RELATED GENE EXPRESSION ANALYSIS
Vikram G. Mookerjee, Xiao Tian Wang, Mariska Raglow-Defranco, Solomon Swartz, Bielinsky Brea, Deborah Ciombor, Paul Y. Liu
Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, USA
2:35
K1.03. TRANSDERMAL DEFEROXAMINE ENHANCES WOUND HEALING IN AGED MICE
Clark A. Bonham, Melanie Rodrigues, Artem Trotsyuk, Zachary Stern-Buchbinder, Mohammed Inayathullah, Jayakumar Rajadas, Geoffrey C. Gurtner
Stanford, Stanford, CA, USA
2:45
K1.04. EPIGENETIC MAPPING OF WOUND EDGE FROM CHRONIC WOUND PATIENTS USING NEXT GENERATION SEQUENCING
Kanhaiya Singh, Sashwati Roy, Durba Pal, Subhadip Ghatak, Shomita Steiner, Devleena Das, Pearlly Yan, Ralf Bundschuh, Savita Khanna, Chandan K. Sen.
The Ohio State University, columbus, OH, USA
2:55
K1.05. KERATINOCYTE-FIBROBLAST CROSSTALK VIA EXTRACELLULAR VESICLES REVEALS INTERPLAY OF MIRNAS THAT INHIBITS KGF SIGNALING IN DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS
Irena Pastar, Horacio A. Ramirez, Andrea F. Ferreira, Ivan Jozic, Marta Garcia-Contreras, Jeffrey McBride, Robert S. Kirsner, Marjana Tomic-Canic
University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA
3:05
K1.06. TRANSDERMAL DEFEROXAMINE SIGNIFICANTLY ENHANCES HEALING OF SICKLE CELL ULCERS
Melanie Rodrigues1, Clark A. Bonham1, Mohammed Inayathullah1, Jayakumar Rajadas1, George P. Yang1, Minniti P. Caterina2, Kalpna Gupta3, Michael T. Longaker1, Geoffrey C. Gurtner1
1Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA,2Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA,3University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA
 
Room 207A
Chronic Wounds and Inflammation (K2)
Moderators: Rummana Aslam, MD; Luris C. De Calero, MD
2:15
K2.01. A MODIFIED COLLAGEN GEL RESOLVES WOUND INFLAMMATION VIA MICRORNA-21-DEPENDENT PRO-HEALING MACROPHAGE POLARIZATION
Amitava Das, Motaz Abas, Savita Khanna, Sashwati Roy, Chandan K. Sen
Department of Surgery, Center for Regenerative Medicine and Cell Based Therapies and Comprehensive Wound Center, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA
2:25
K2.02. PHYSIOLOGICAL CELL REPROGRAMMING AT THE SITE OF TISSUE INJURY CRITICAL ROLE OF MIR-21
Mithun Sinha1, Kanhaiya Singh1, Amitava Das1, Subhadip Ghatak1, Heather Powell2, Brian Rhea1, Britani Blackstone2, Savita Khanna1, Chandan K Sen1, Sashwati Roy1
1Comprehensive Wound Center, Center for Regenerative Medicine and Cell Based Therapies, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA,2Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
2:35
K2.03. VIABLE CRYOPRESERVED UMBILICAL TISSUE (VCUT) BARRIER REDUCES POST OPERATIVE ADHESIONS IN A RABBIT ABDOMINAL ADHESION MODEL
Sandeep Dhall1, Turhan Coksaygan2, Tyler M. Hoffman1, Mathew Moorman1, Anne Lerch1, Jin-Qiang Kuang1, Malathi Sathyamoorthy1, Alla Danilkovitch1
1Osiris Therapeutics Inc., Columbia, MD, USA,2University of Maryland, Baltimore, Baltimore, MD, USA
2:45
K2.04. THE ROLE OF THE MICROSURGICAL TISSUE TRANSFER IN DIABETIC FOOT ULCER: COMPLETING THE MOST FUNCTIONAL HEALING
Donghyeok Shin, Dongkun Jeon
Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea, Republic of
2:55
K2.05. SUBSTANCE P ACTIVATES THE EPIDERMAL DENDRITIC T CELLS TO PROMOTE WOUND HEALING BY PRODUCING NGF
Guo-You ZHANG, Yi-Xuan ZHAO, Qing-Feng LI, Lian ZHU
Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital, Shanghai, China
3:05
K2.06. HUMAN MACROPHAGE RESPONSE TO BACTERIAL AND FUNGAL ISOLATES FROM DIABETIC FOOT ULCERS
Carly Deusenbery1, Anamika Bajpai, PhD1, Lindsay Kalan, PhD2, Jacquelyn S. Meisel2, Brandon Marcinkiewicz, MS1, Sue E. Gardner, PhD3, Elizabeth Grice, PhD2, Kara L. Spiller, PhD1
1Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA,2University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA,3University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA
 
Room 203A
ECM, Fibrosis and Scarring (K3)
Moderators: Jeffrey M. Davidson, MD; Veronica Haywood, MD
2:15
K3.01. ROLE OF MRTF-A AND MRTF-B IN POST-OPERATIVE INTRA-ABDOMINAL ADHESION FORMATION
Paul McGaha1, Cullen McCarthy1, Phillip Bonney2, James Griffith1, Eric Howard1, James Tomasek1, Jason Lees1, William Berry1
1University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA,2 University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA
2:25
K3.02. REGULATION OF HYALURONAN METABOLISM ATTENUATES ORGAN FIBROSIS
Xinyi Wang1, Swathi Balaji1, Alexander Blum1, Hui Li1, Emily Steen1, Natalie Templeman1, Paul Bollyky2, Sundeep Keswani1
1BCM, Houston, TX, USA,2Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
2:35
K3.03. COMPARATIVE RNA-SEQ TRANSCRIPTOMIC ANALYSIS USING INGENUITY PATHWAY OF UNSCARRED HUMAN SKIN, VERSUS NORMAL SCARRING AND ABNORMAL KELOID SCARS
Silvian Tan, Ping Wang, Ardeshir Bayat
University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
2:45
K3.04. WT1 TRANSCRIPTS ARE ALTERNATIVELY SPLICED AND M1 CYTOKINE INDUCIBLE IN PALMAR FASCIA FIBROBLASTS
John Luo, Emmy Sun, Trisiah Tugade, Ana Pena Diaz, Bing Siang Gan, Ruby Grewal, Nina Suh, David B. O'Gorman
Lawson Health Research Institute and University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada
2:55
K3.05. POTENTIAL ROLE OF NEUROPEPTIDE RECEPTORS IN SCLERODERMA
Mohamed M. Ibrahim, Elizabeth McKinnon, Mary E. Sunday, Howard Levinson
Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
3:05
K3.06. MYOFIBROBLAST DIFFERENTIATION OF FETAL FIBROBLASTS IS INHIBITED IN RESPONSE TO ECM RIGIDITY AND TGF-B1
Aron Parekh, PhD, Rachel J. Jerrell, Mitchell J. Leih
Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA
 
Room 203B
Angiogenesis (K4)
Moderators: Aredeshir Bayat, AA/AS; Rubin Basson, MD
2:15
K4.01. ANGIOGENESIS THROUGH STIMULATION WITH EXTERNAL VOLUME EXPANSION IMPROVES ADIPOSE TISSUE GRAFT RETENTION IN A RADIATION FIBROSIS MODEL
Robert Slamin, BS, Jorge Lujan-Hernandez,MD, Michael S. Chin, MD, Janice F. Lalikos, MD
University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA
2:25
K4.02. INTERLEUKIN-10 IMPROVES DIABETIC WOUND NEOVASCULARIZATION VIA ENDOTHELIAL PROGENITOR CELL (EPC) RECRUITMENT
Emily Steen1, Swathi Balaji1, Kenneth Liechty2, Timothy Crombleholme2, Paul Bollyky3, Sundeep Keswani1
1BCM, Houston, TX, USA,2U Colorado SOM, Aurora, CO, USA,3Stanford University SOM, Stanford, CA, USA
2:35
K4.03. DECREASED LYMPHANGIOGENESIS IN THE SKIN OF PATIENTS WITH KELOID
Guo-You ZHANG, Yi-Xuan ZHAO, Qing-Feng LI, Chao-Hua JIANG, Lian ZHU
Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital, Shanghai, China
2:45
K4.04. IMPROVED PERFUSION AND WOUND HEALING IN HEALTHY PIGS WITH MRG-110, AN INHIBITOR OF MICRORNA-92A
Rusty L. Montgomery, Linda A. Pestano, Corrie L. Gallant-Behm, Paul Rubin
miRagen Therapeutics, Boulder, CO, USA
2:55
K4.05. EPITHELIAL HYPOXAMIR MIR-210 DIRECTLY CONTRIBUTES TO ISCHEMIC SKIN INJURY
Ayan Biswas, Subhadip Ghatak, Mohamed El Masry, Savita Khanna, Sashwati Roy, Chandan K. Sen
Ohio State University, columbus, OH, USA
3:05
K4.06. DETECTION OF ACUTE VASCULAR OCCLUSION USING OXYGEN MONITORING IN MYOCUTANEOUS FLAPS
Mohamed M. Ibrahim1, Jennifer S. Chien1, Mahmoud M. Mohammed1, Timothy King2, Bruce Klitzman1
1Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA,2University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL, USA
3:15 PM - 3:30 PM
BREAK
3:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Crown Ballroom
WHS DAY 3 GENERAL SESSION - OPIOIDS & WOUND HEALING
Moderators: Sashwati Roy, PhD
Speaker: Victoria K. Shanmugam, MD, FACR, FACP

Opioids are frequently required in the management of pain in healing wounds, particularly when there is impaired healing. Wounds are known to contain opioid receptors, and opioids are known to have effects beyond analgesia, including T-cell inhibition and respiratory depression. Recently, it has been shown that greater opioid use is associated with impaired healing. In this session, the complex effects of opioids in wound healing will be discussed.
4:30 PM - 4:45 PM
BREAK
4:45 PM - 5:45 PM
Room 207BCD
WHS Session L: WOUND HEALING FOUNDATION - 3M AWARD LECTURE
Moderators: Laura Parnell, BS, MS, CWS; Joshua Tam, PhD
Speaker: Veronica Haywood, DPT

Diabetic Lower Extremity Ulcerations (DLEU's) are a common complication of diabetes (DM) that severely impact quality of life and can lead to amputation. With DM reaching epidemic proportions, a thorough understanding of the pathogenesis involved in impaired healing is required. Previous studies suggest that DM can alter glycosylation related gene expression leading to changes in protein sialylation and fucosylation. A disruption of the normal patterns of enzymatic protein glycosylation during wound healing would be expected to lead to functional alterations in cellular-protein interactions and signaling, thereby affecting wound healing and epithelial integrity. Although the expression and activity of ceramide glycosyl transferases are recognized as a necessary component of normal epidermal homeostasis and skin barrier function, most other glycosylation related pathways have been ignored during normal and DM cutaneous wound healing. Our preliminary studies have identified multiple glycosylation gene pathways that are differentially expressed in DM and normal skin wound healing, including polysialylation. Additionally, our analysis of previously published datasets identified alterations in N- and O- linked glycosylation related pathways in ulcerated versus intact human DM skin. With funding from the Wound Healing Society Foundation 3M Fellow Award, we are investigating the regulation of enzymatic protein glycosylation during diabetic and non-diabetic wound healing to determine whether diabetes induces impairments in skin wound healing by altering the pattern of normal protein glycosylation.
5:45 PM - 6:45 PM
Room 207BCD
WHS BUSINESS MEETING
6:45 PM - 7:15 PM
Room 207BCD
WHS Session M: RAPID FIRE POSTER TALKS
Moderators: Praveen R. Arany, DDS, PhD; Gayle M. Gordillo, MD

This session will highlight the highest scoring abstracts selected for poster presentations. Eight short 'rapid-fire' poster talks will be featured. Presenters will have one slide and two minutes to summarize novel research findings, then one minute to answer questions. This session will immediately precede the poster gala, where all poster presenters will be available to discuss their research.
6:48
M1.01. PROTEASE-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR-2 KNOCKDOWN ATTENUATES THE FIBROTIC PHENOTYPE IN POST-BURN HYPERTROPHIC SCAR FIBROBLASTS
Jayson W. Jay, Anesh Prasai, Amina El Ayadi, David N. Herndon, Celeste C. Finnerty
University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA
6:51
M1.02. MECHANICAL EDUCATION IN VITRO ENHANCES REGENERATIVE CAPACITIES OF HUMAN MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS IN VIVO
Marielle Walraven, Akosua Vilaysane, John E. Davies, Boris Hinz
University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
6:54
M1.03. FIBROBLAST MEDIATED NAX SIGNALING DRIVES INFLAMMATION IN OPEN WOUNDS
Huining Bian, Ping Xie, Elena Bogdanovic, Emily Elizabeth Friedrich, Seok Jong Hong, Robert Galiano, Thomas Mustoe
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA
6:57
M1.04. BIOFILM INFECTION POSES RISK OF OXIDATIVE STRESS VIA REDOX CYCLING OF SECRETORY PYOCYANIN
Karamjeet Kaur, James Boslett, Craig Hemann, Jay L. Zweier, Chandan K. Sen
Comprehensive Wound Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
7:00
M1.05. DIFFERENTIAL TIGHT JUNCTION EXPRESSION IN SKIN AND MUCOSAL WOUNDS
Junhe Shi, Luisa A. DiPietro, Lin Chen
Center for Wound Healing and Tissue Regeneration, College of Dentistry, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA
7:03
M1.06. COULD -79 ░C SPRAY-TYPE CRYOTHERAPY BE AN EFFECTIVE MONOTHERAPY FOR THE TREATMENT OF KELOID?
Tae Hwan Park1, Yun Joo Park2
1CHA University, Seongnam-Si, Korea, Republic of,2Hallym University, Anyang-Si, Korea, Republic of
7:06
M1.07. RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY AND HPLC: IN VIVO AND EX-VIVO VALIDATION OF A COMBI-APPROACH FOR TESTING TRANSDERMAL DELIVERY OF COMPOUNDS IN WOUNDS AND SCARS
Rubinder Basson1, Martin Isabelle2, Weiping Li1, Mohamed Baguneid3, David Reece2, Ardeshir Bayat1
1University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom,2Renishaw, Gloucestershire, United Kingdom,3Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom
7:09
M1.08. CONTRIBUTION OF INDIVIDUAL SATELLITE CELLS TO MUSCLE REGENERATION ASSESSED USING A CONFETTI MOUSE MODEL
Hans Heemskerk1, N Suhas Jagannathan1, Binh Phu Nguyen1, Keshmarathy D/O Sacadevan2, Paul Matsudaira2, Peter TC So3, Lisa Tucker-Kellogg1
1Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore,2National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore,3Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA
7:15 PM - 8:45 PM
Hall C1
WHS AND SAWC SPRING POSTER GALA/AWARDS
Poster presenters should attend this entire event
DAY 4: SATURDAY, APRIL 28, 2018
<< Day 3
7:30 AM - 9:00 AM
INDUSTRY-SUPPORTED BREAKFAST SYMPOSIA
9:00 AM - 9:15 AM
BREAK
9:15 AM - 10:15 AM
WHS SESSION N: CONCURRENT ORAL ABSTRACTS III (non-accredited)
Oral presentations will feature the highest scoring abstracts submitted to the WHS.
 
Room 207BCD
Scarring, ECM & Regeneration (N1)
Moderators: Braham Shroot, PhD; Ivan Jozic, MD
9:15
N1.01. MECHANICALTENSION REGULATES MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL PARACRINE SIGNALING ON DERMALFIBROBLASTS VIA MICRORNA- AND LINCRNA-ENRICHED EXOSOMES
Natalie Templeman1, Hui Li1, Emily Steen1, Xinyi Wang1, Alexander Blum1, Paul Bollyky2, Sundeep Keswani1, Swathi Balaji1
1Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA,2Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
9:25
N1.02. A COMPLEX MECHANISM OF EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX INDUCTION BY ER CHAPERONE CALRETICULIN AND TGF-? FOR TISSUE REGENERATION
Leslie I. Gold, Unnati M. Pandya, Julien Daubriac, Ana Tellechea, Miguel M. Manzanares, Chinaza Egbuta
New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA
9:35
N1.03. MICRO-ARCHITECTURAL ANALYSIS OF UNSCARRED AND SCARRED HUMAN DERMIS PROVIDES STRUCTURAL INSIGHT FOR FUTURE SCAFFOLD DESIGN
Umair Khan, Ardeshir Bayat
University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
9:45
N1.04. DYNAMIC FIBROBLAST CONTRACTIONS ATTRACT REMOTE MACROPHAGES IN FIBRILLAR COLLAGEN MATRIX
Pardis Pakshir1, Moien Alizadehgiashi2, Boaz Wong3, Nuno Miranda Coelho4, Christopher McCulloch5, Boris Hinz6
1Laboratory of Tissue Repair and Regeneration, Matrix Dynamics Group, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, toronto, ON, Canada,2Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada,3 Department of Physiology, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada,4Matrix Dynamics Group, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada,5Matrix Dynamics5Group, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, TORONTO, ON, Canada,6Laboratory of Tissue Repair and Regeneration, Matrix Dynamics Group, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
9:55
N1.05. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF PERICYTES FROM BURN ESCHAR TISSUES
Alexander Evdokiou1, Richard Bodnar2, Latha Satish1
1Shriners Hospitals for Children-Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA,2Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA
10:05
N1.06. DECELLULARIZED KELOID MATRIX AS A NOVEL THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODEL FOR STUDYING CELLULAR BEHAVIOR OF ABNORMAL KELOID FIBROBLASTS
Silvian Tan, Ardeshir Bayat
University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
 
Room 207A
Chronic Wounds (N2)
Moderators: Anie Philip, PhD; Lisa Tucker-Kellogg, MD
9:15
N2.01. IMPORTANCE OF OXIDATIVE STRESS ON THE INITIATION OF CHRONIC WOUND DEVELOPMENT IN A DIABETIC CHRONIC WOUND MOUSE MODEL
Jane H. Kim, Amanda Tedesco, Paul Ruegger, James Borneman, Manuela Martins-Green
University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA, USA
9:25
N2.02. N-ACETYL-CYSTEINE DISASSEMBLES BACTERIAL BIOFILM AND CAUSES CELL DEATH LEADING TO DISAPPEARANCE OF THE BIOFILM AND IMPROVED WOUND HEALING
Xin C. Li, Amanda Tedesco, Jane H. Kim, Manuela Martins-Green
University of California Riverside, Riverside, CA, USA
9:35
N2.03. GLOBAL GENE DYSREGULATION DUE TO HIGH OXIDATIVE STRESS LEADS TO CHRONIC WOUND INITIATON
Jane H. Kim, Sandeep Dhall, Manuela Martins-Green
University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA, USA
9:45
N2.04. RENAL DYSFUNCTION AGGRAVATED IMPAIRED DIABETIC CUTANEOUS WOUND HEALING
Seok Hong, Ping Xie, Mimi wu young, Huining Bian, Solmaz N. Leilabadi, Thomas A. Mustoe, Robert D. Galiano
Northwestern university, Chicago, IL, USA
9:55
N2.05. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF FRICTION AND SHEAR IN THE PREVENTION OF CONTEMPORARY HOSPITAL ACQUIRED PRESSURE ULCERS
Raysa Cabrejo, Sifon Ndon, Ean Saberski, Carolyn Chuang, Henry C. Hsia
Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA
10:05
N2.06. EFFECTS OF NONCONTACT LOW FREQUENCYULTRASOUND (NLFU) ON WOUND HEALING AT THE MOLECULAR LEVEL
Cornelia Wiegand1, Kyle Bittenger2, Robert D. Galiano3, Vickie R. Driver4, Pamela G. Unger5, Helen D. Hahn5, Gary W. Gibbons6
1University Hospital Jena, Jena, Germany,2Department of Microbiology, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA,3Division of Plastic Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA,4Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA,5Alliqua Biomedical, Inc, Langhorne, PA, USA,6Center for Wound Healing, South Shore Hospital, Weymouth, MA, US
 
Room 203A
Inflammation and Immunity (N3)
Moderators: Michael Schurr, MD; Xinyi Wang, MD
9:15
N3.01. CHRONIC WOUND MICROBIOME COLONIZATION ON MOUSE MODEL FOLLOWING CRYOGENIC PRESERVATION
Craig D. Tipton1, Nick Sanford2, Jake Everett3, Randall D. Wolcott2, Kendra P. Rumbaugh3, Caleb D. Phillips1
1Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, USA,2Southwest Regional Wound Care Center, Lubbock, TX, USA,3Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX, USA
9:25
N3.02. COLLAGENASE RESOLVES WOUND INFLAMMATION THROUGH A PGE 2 -EP4-STAT6 MEDIATED PRO-HEALING MACROPHAGE POLARIZATION
Amitava Das1, Soma Datta1, Eric Roche2, Scott Chaffee 1, Lei Shi2, Komel Grover2, Savita Khanna1, Chandan K. Sen1, Sashwati Roy1
1Department of Surgery, Center for Regenerative Medicine and Cell Based Therapies and Comprehensive Wound Center, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA, 2Research & Development, Smith & Nephew, Inc., Fort Worth, TX, USA
9:35
N3.03. GRANZYME B IN SUB-EPIDERMAL BLISTERING
David J. Granville, Valerio Russo, Theo Klein, Nick Carr, Richard Crawford, Chris M. Overall
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
9:45
N3.04. HYPERGLYCEMIA INDUCES LONG NON-CODING RNA GAS5 EXPRESSION THROUGH THE RIBOSOMAL BINDING PROTEIN HUR
Junwang Xu, Junyi Hu, Carlos Zgheib, Maggie M. Hodges, Kenneth W. Liechty
University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA
9:55
N3.05. INVESTIGATION OF ENDOGENOUS GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES AFTER VEGF GENE THERAPY VIA AAV2 DOUBLE-STRANDED VECTORS
Xiao Tian Wang, Vikram G. Mookerjee, William R. Miklavcic, Sherry YQ Tang, Paul Y. Liu
Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, USA
10:05
N3.06. AN EFFECTIVE "ANTI-INFLAMMATORY/ANTI-ROS" COMBINATION THERAPY THAT ACCELERATES DIABETIC WOUND HEALING
Carlos Zgheib1, Junyi Hu1, Junwang Xu1, Maggie M. Hodges1, Sarah A. Hilton1, Lindel C. Dewberry1, Sudipta Seal2, Kenneth W. Liechty, MD, FACS1
1Laboratory for Fetal and Regenerative Biology, University Of Colorado Denver and Colorado Children's Hospital, Aurora, CO, USA,2Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center, Nanoscience Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, USA
 
Room 203B
Acute Wounds (N4)
Moderators: Harvey N. Himel, MD, MPH; Subhadip Ghatak, PhD
9:15
N4.01. NEXT GENERATION SEQUENCING REVEALS NOVEL MECHANISM OF STATIN ACTION TO PROMOTE HEALING IN PRE-CLINICAL AND CLINICAL MODELS
Andrew Sawaya, Irena Pastar, Ivan Jozic, Olivera Stojadinovic, Stephen C. Davis, Joel Gill, Robert S. Kirsner, Marjana Tomic-Canic
Wound Healing and Regenerative Medicine Research Program, Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA
9:25
N4.02. PEG-PLASMA HYDROGELS INCREASE EPITHELIALIZATION USING A HUMAN EX VIVO SKIN MODEL
Randolph Stone, II, John Wall, Kyle Florell, Shanmugasundaram Natesan, Robert Christy
US Army Institute of Surgical Research, Fort Sam Houston, TX, USA
9:35
N4.03. PLATELET RICH PLASMA TREATMENT ACCELERATES RE-EPITHELIALIZATION IN A MURINE MODEL OF EXCISIONAL WOUND HEALING
Bonnie C. Carney1, Benjamin J. Browne1, Lauren T. Moffatt1, Dean S. Rosenthal2, Jeffrey W. Shupp1
1MedStar Health Research Institute, Washington, DC, USA,2Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA
9:45
N4.04. SKIN-SPECIFIC HYALURONAN KNOCKDOWN IN MICE BY AN OPTIMIZED TOPICAL 4-METHYLUMBELLIFERONE FORMULATION
Emily H. Steen1, Hui Li1, Xinyi Wang1, Natalie Templeman1, Alexander Blum1, Paul Bollyky2, Sundeep G. Keswani1, Swathi Balaji1
1BCM, Houston, TX, USA,2Stanford University SOM, Stanford, CA, USA
9:55
N4.05. SUBSTANCE P PROMOTES FIBROSIS IN HUMAN CORNEAL STROMA
Marta Sloniecka, Patrik Danielson
Umeň University, Umeň, Sweden
10:05
N4.06. OMEGA-3 RICH FISH SKIN GRAFTS REDUCE DONOR SKIN REQUIREMENTS FOR FULL THICKNESS BURNS
Randolph Stone, II1, David Larson1, John Wall1, Kyle Florell1, Hannah Dillon1, Skuli Magnusson2, Hilmar Kjartansson2, Shanmugasundaram Natesan1, Robert Christy1
1US Army Institute of Surgical Research, Fort Sam Houston, TX, USA,2 Kerecis, Reykjavik, Iceland
10:15 AM - 10:30 AM
BREAK
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM
Crown Ballroom
WHS Day 4 GENERAL SESSION - FACE TRANSPLANT AS A MODEL FOR TISSUE ENGINEERING
Moderators: Paul Y. Liu, MD
Speaker: Elof Eriksson, MD

Deep burns and tangential missile wounds can destroy the face while the brain remains fully functional. Current methods for wound closure including debridement, antimicrobials, skin transplantation and skin flaps provide unsatisfactory functional and esthetic results even after extensive reconstructive procedures. Since the first partial face transplant in France approximately 40 more have been done World Wide.

We have done a series of 7 face transplants successfully. 3 of the patients were injured by thermal burns, one by a chemical burn, two by missile injuries and one by animal bites. 5 patients were male and 2 were female. Donors were chosen from patients of the same sex, same skin color and with an age difference of less than 10 years.

After the transplantation, every patient has had at least one rejection episode which was treated successfully and all patients have retained their transplants. Diagnostic, technical, immune suppressive and other postoperative management issues will be discussed. Face transplantation seems to be indicated in the most severe facial injuries.
11:30 AM
WHS MEETING ADJOURNS
11:45 AM - 2:15 PM
Hall C1
LUNCH WITH EXHIBITORS