Wound Healing Society

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Implantable Oxygen Platform For Continuous, Real-time Detection Of Vascular Perfusion And Ischemia
Mohamed M. Ibrahim, Ryan M. Schweller, Mahmoud M. Mohammed, David B. Powers, Bruce Klitzman.
Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA.

PURPOSE:
Lack of adequate perfusion can only be assessed post-operatively, after onset of tissue necrosis. We have developed new materials-based oxygen biosensor that can be implanted for deep and superficial measurements of tissue-oxygen-tension (TOT) in response to changes in perfusion.
METHODS:
Porphyrin-based sensors were incorporated into biocompatible hydrogels. To investigate TOT, sensors implanted intradermally and subcutaneously in rats. Sensor activity confirmed by modulating inspired oxygen levels between 12%-100%. Sensor modulation confirmed at 3,7,14 days post-implantation. Sensors similarly implanted in pigs to monitor TOT. To mimic ischemic-events, sensors directly injected at various-depths in pig-tongue which was then subject to tourniquet-ischemia.
RESULTS:
Oxygen-sensors modulated appropriately to changes in oxygen-levels. In-vivo TOT could be modulated from 0-110mmHg by modulating inspired-oxygen between 12%-100%. Sensors could also be detected in non-perfused, ex-vivo human-skin via near-infrared-fluorescence using an imaging system(IVIS). Both fluorescence and lifetime-based measurements could be obtained after at least 1cm-deep-implantations. When implanted in pigs, sensors could be monitored at 5 anatomical sites simultaneously and permitted real-time monitoring of TOT during anesthesia and euthanasia. In swine-tongue, sensors immediately detected application


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