Wound Healing Society

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Platelet Rich Plasma Treatment Accelerates Re-epithelialization In A Murine Model Of Excisional Wound Healing
Bonnie C. Carney1, Benjamin J. Browne1, Lauren T. Moffatt1, Dean S. Rosenthal2, Jeffrey W. Shupp1.
1MedStar Health Research Institute, Washington, DC, USA, 2Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA.

Background: Rapid wound closure is critical, as intact skin is the body’s barrier against insult by environmental factors. Therefore, it is of interest to develop a safe and effective means for accelerating wound healing. Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) when activated, releases growth factorsthat may contribute to accelerated wound healing. Methods: PRP was created by multiple rounds of centrifugation of citrated whole blood. Punch biopsies (6mm) were used to create two wounds on the dorsum of C57BL/6 mice. Splints were placed on the wounds to encourage healing by re-epithelialization instead of contraction. One group of animals received no treatment, while another received PRP. PRP was activated by CaCl2 and recombinant thrombin to form a gel that was applied to each wound. Photos of wounds were taken prior to necropsy at days 3, 5, or 7 post-injury and entire wounds were fixed in formalin. Open wound areas were quantified using Image J to assess rates of healing. The fixed wounds were stained with H&E or Cytokeratin 16 and were examined histomorphometrically for re-epithelialization. Results: Wright giemsa staining confirmed platelet concentration in PRP compared to whole blood. PRP-treated wounds re-epithelialized faster compared to untreated wounds when wound photos were analyzed at Days 3 and 5 (n=6 wounds, p<0.05). Open wound areas were smaller in treated wounds when H&E and Cytokeratin 16 sections were analyzed. Conclusions: Due to its autologous nature, PRP serves as a safe and efficacious option for accelerating wound healing.


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