Wound Healing Society

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Clinical Evaluation Of Microbial And Metabolite Changes In Minor Wound Healing
Latrisha K. Petersen, InSeok Seo, Erin Zaleski, Parneet Kaur, Kimberly Capone, Melinda Cettina, Paul Zhang, Robert J. Gambogi, Amisha Parikh-Das.
Johnson & Johnson, Skillman, NJ, USA.

Wound healing research has primarily focused on chronic or surgical wounds. There is a need for greater understanding of the minor wound and changes that occur with the biophysical and biological environments during its healing cycle. These environmental changes may impact the likelihood of infection, time of healing, tensile strength of healed wounds, scarring, and overall skin health. This clinical study was conducted to better understand biophysical and metabolite changes of the minor wound using novel methods in wound research. This single center, 15-day, clinical trial enrolled 35 healthy subjects. Each subject had 5 tape-stripped minor wounds created on their backs; each wound was randomized to coverage with one of 5 different marketed adhesive bandages or was left uncovered. On average, wounds covered with Band-Aid® Brand Adhesive Bandages resulted in significantly less water loss and faster recovery of redness (oxyhemoglobin level) in the wound as compared to uncovered wounds. This correlated very well with the metabolomics analysis which revealed that covered wounds had decreased metabolites associated with oxidative stress, lipid inflammation, cellular dehydration and collagen turnover. These improved biophysical and metabolite outcomes resulted in most Band-Aid® Brand Adhesive Bandage-covered wounds trending towards faster wound closure than uncovered wounds. In summary, this study identified key differences in wound healing of covered vs. uncovered minor wounds including cellular metabolites and environmental factors such as pH, water loss and oxyhemoglobin levels. These findings provide new insight into our understanding of the minor wound and highlight key features that could be targeted to provide a more optimal healing environment.


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